on the handless phone

Mum, in her comment to the previous post about crazies, brings up a very good point. One that I have been meaning to comment on myself, so here we go:

As she noted, it is difficult to tell the difference between someone who is crazy and talking to themselves, and someone who is perfectly sane, though possibly socially inconsiderate. Take for instance yet another crazy person that I came in contact with recently, though did not mention in the last post because it was in Carls Jr not while at work.

I was on my lunch, and walked across the parking lot to get some chicken strips. Upon entering the restaurant I noted  a man sitting over a sandwich and drink. He was deep in conversation, with no one visible. I imagined him to be crazy. Then, as I waited for my chicken strips, and small fries (what can I say, I splurged!), I changed my mind. His conversation was utterly coherent. He had pauses implying response time, a clear direction to the conversation, and some social propriety in attempting to keep his conversation from disturbing those around him. In examining his clothing again I saw that it was not the typical ware of the non-insane, but could pass for a business man on his day off in Southern California. However, as I listened longer, I noticed that he seemed not unsatisfied having one conversation, but started several. So I looked at his ears. Nothing. Both ears were perfectly bare of blinking blue lights and flashy little doodads.

The difficulty is not that crazy people talk to themselves, nor that business men look like they talk to themselves. Rather, the difficulty is that it is becoming increasingly difficult to look at a person and classify them as a highly successful business man or the clinically insane.

This displeases me.

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~ by jeorgesmith on 19 March 2008.

One Response to “on the handless phone”

  1. I will make it easy for you. Clinically, no one is insane. “Insane” is a legal term, referring to one’s ability to be responsible for one’s actions and well-being. Clinically, one is determined to be, or not be, “mentally ill”. See? Easy. Are you pleased now?

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